Tag Archives: Wikileaks

How to hide from Big Brother’s Online Eyes

We’re all online, and everything we do there leaves a trail. Big Brother left a blueprint for the type of information you need to protect if you want to hide your tracks:

“Further proof has emerged of the United States secret Grand Jury investigation into Julian Assange and WikiLeaks.”

The secret Grand Jury demanded the following information from WikiLeaks’ DNS host:

1. Subscriber names, user names, screen names, or other identities;
2. mailing addresses, residential addresses, business addresses, e-mail addresses, and other contact information;
3. connection records, or record of session times and durations;
4. length of service (including start date) and typos of service utilized;
5. telephone or instrument number or other subscriber number or identity; including any temporarily assigned network address; and
6. means and source of payment for such service (including any credit card or bank account number) and billing records.

Also:

1. records of user activity for any connections made to or from the Account
2. non-content information associated with the contents of any communication or file stored by or for the account(s), such as the source and destination email addresses and IP addresses.
3. Correspondence and notes of records related to the account.”

From: http://rabble.ca/news/2011/08/us-espionage-investigation-against-wikileaks-patriot-act-order-unsealed

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http://www.SPYWRITER.com

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WikiJustice: WikiLeaks meets The Assassination Bureau, Ltd.

A friend of mine once asked, “What would Jack London do with his thriller, The Assassination Bureau. Ltd., had he lived in the beginning of the 21st century?”

Jack London wrote a thriller? I was stumped. So I rushed to my local library to read it. “The Assassination Bureau, Ltd.”, is an unfinished novel by Jack London, later completed by Robert L. Fish. The idea of an agency devoted to “extirpating” socially detrimental characters was fascinating, alas, the novel left an unsatisfactory feeling in my reading taste.

My friend’s question has haunted me for over a year, when at last world events set a spark in my writerly imagination. What, indeed, if a novelist set out to write a thriller in a similar vein, in the age of WikiLeaks, the Occupy Movement, and the general discontent with the World Order, that we witness today?

In the age of crowdsourcing – a collaboration of countless minds from across boundaries – the idea of a single person (Ivan Dragomiloff in London’s novel) deciding arbitrarily who ought to be assassinated (“extirpated”), seemed incompatible. A collaborative effort, on the other hand, was much more alluring.

It was, thus, natural that in the time of social networking the people should decide who is detrimental for the wellbeing of society.

WikiJustice was born.

The Spy Files

“Mass interception of entire populations is not only a reality, it is a secret new industry spanning 25 countries

It sounds like something out of Hollywood, but as of today, mass interception systems, built by Western intelligence contractors, including for ’political opponents’ are a reality.

International surveillance companies are based in the more technologically sophisticated countries, and they sell their technology on to every country of the world. This industry is, in practice, unregulated. Intelligence agencies, military forces and police authorities are able to silently, and on mass, and secretly intercept calls and take over computers without the help or knowledge of the telecommunication providers. Users’ physical location can be tracked if they are carrying a mobile phone, even if it is only on stand by.

Intelligence companies such as VASTech secretly sell equipment to permanently record the phone calls of entire nations.”
MORE: http://wikileaks.org/the-spyfiles.html

What hacker-activists have in common with secret services

“WikiLeaks raises the question as to what hackers have in common with secret services, since an elective affinity between the two is unmistakable. The love-hate relationship goes back to the very beginning of computing. One does not have to be a fan of German media theorist Friedrich Kittler or, for that matter, conspiracy theories, to acknowledge that the computer was born out of the military-industrial complex. From Alan Turing’s deciphering of the Nazi Enigma code up to the role played by the first computers in the invention of the atomic bomb, from the cybernetics movement up to the Pentagon’s involvement in the creation of the Internet – the articulation between computational information and the military-industrial complex is well established. Computer scientists and programmers have shaped the information revolution and the culture of openness; but at the same time they have also developed encryption (“crypto”), closing access to data for the non-initiated. What some see as “citizen journalism” others call “info war”.

WikiLeaks is also an organization deeply shaped by 1980s hacker culture, combined with the political values of techno-libertarianism that emerged in the 1990s. The fact that WikiLeaks was founded – and to a large extent is still run – by hard-core geeks is essential to understanding its values and moves. Unfortunately, this comes together with a good dose of the less savoury aspects of hacker culture. Not that idealism, the desire to contribute to making the world a better place, could be denied to WikiLeaks: on the contrary. But this brand of idealism (or, if you prefer, anarchism) is paired with a preference for conspiracies, an elitist attitude and a cult of secrecy (never mind condescension). This is not conducive to collaboration with like-minded people and groups, who are relegated to being the simple consumers of WikiLeaks output. The missionary zeal to enlighten the idiotic masses and “expose” the lies of government, the military and corporations is reminiscent of the well-known (or infamous) media-culture paradigm from the 1950s.”
MORE: http://www.eurozine.com/articles/2010-12-07-lovinkriemens-en.html

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www.SpyWriter.com

WikiLeaks is dying. WikiJustice is born.

WikiLeaks may cease to exists because there is no way to support it financially (though not for the lack of will among the 99-percenters).

“The shutting down of the WikiLeaks website due to financial problems is unfortunate, even though it had become almost inevitable that its end was nigh. Organisations such as Mastercard, Visa, Western Union and PayPal, though not directly funding WikiLeaks, were effective channels for those who wanted to donate to it from across the world. Once they withdrew support, the donations dried up and the website ran out of cash, after which staying afloat was a struggle. Though no one will officially admit it, the connection between these organisations’ refusal to allow donations to go through them and the United States government’s displeasure at disclosures made by WikiLeaks is too blatant to be ignored.” source

How is it possible that no channel exists in the entire world by which a person could support WikiLeaks? It’s because of what you always suspected: a handful of companies control the entire financial / economic system:

“The work, to be published in PLoS One, revealed a core of 1318 companies with interlocking ownerships (see image). Each of the 1318 had ties to two or more other companies, and on average they were connected to 20. What’s more, although they represented 20 per cent of global operating revenues, the 1318 appeared to collectively own through their shares the majority of the world’s large blue chip and manufacturing firms – the “real” economy – representing a further 60 per cent of global revenues.

When the team further untangled the web of ownership, it found much of it tracked back to a “super-entity” of 147 even more tightly knit companies – all of their ownership was held by other members of the super-entity – that controlled 40 per cent of the total wealth in the network. “In effect, less than 1 per cent of the companies were able to control 40 per cent of the entire network,” says Glattfelder. Most were financial institutions.” source

Do not despair! WikiLeaks may suspend its operations, perhaps even cease to exist, but WIKIJUSTICE will set things straight:

5 years of WikiLeaks revelations

Industrial Espionage

According to WikiLeaks, France is the worst offender when it comes to industrial espionage. Not China, or Russia, but France, an example of a “democratic”, capitalist society. Capital, or greed, is the key. That’s why during communist times the People’s countries ran informational campaigns warning of the imperialist thieves…

This poster from communist Poland reads:

“Guard state secrets”

And this one reads:

“Guard professional secrecy, perhaps the enemy wants to get it out of you”

Nose for the truth

calculated risk
cautiously optimistic
controlled chaos
defensive strike
detailed summary
educated guess
extended deadline
free trade
minor crisis
negative growth
resident alien
sharp curve
unbiased opinion
[etc.]

There is a reason why I do not read or watch corporate media, this dinosaur of oxymoron and opinion. Here are some examples of what lies at the core of today’s mass corporate media: the assumption that recipients of this gibberish are idiots.

Perhaps behind it all is fear, after all if you publish the truth you may face assassination