Tag Archives: Occupy Movement

The book for the Occupy Movement and the 99%

A book that was published in 1943, but… “One chapter in particular might have been written in 2012, not 1943. Its title: “Political Action for the 99%.”

“Many of us have become cynical where politics is concerned. Corruption, class legislation and political irresponsibility no longer move us to indignation. Instead, we shrug our shoulders, as if to say, ‘What can you expect?’ This attitude threatens the whole democratic fabric of our country.

‘The people’s will must be made effective’

“Let there be no mistake: the political life of the country will be controlled, if not by the people, then by the vested interests. Indifference on our part is precisely the guarantee that special privilege will continue to rule. The people’s will must be made effective. To achieve this end, they must gain control of economic and political power.”

From: http://thetyee.ca/Books/2012/01/06/Prophets-Of-The-Occupiers/

Prefer a novel? Here’s one, published in 2012, for the Occupy Movement, the 99percenters, and whistleblowers: WikiJustice.

WikiJustice: WikiLeaks meets The Assassination Bureau, Ltd.

A friend of mine once asked, “What would Jack London do with his thriller, The Assassination Bureau. Ltd., had he lived in the beginning of the 21st century?”

Jack London wrote a thriller? I was stumped. So I rushed to my local library to read it. “The Assassination Bureau, Ltd.”, is an unfinished novel by Jack London, later completed by Robert L. Fish. The idea of an agency devoted to “extirpating” socially detrimental characters was fascinating, alas, the novel left an unsatisfactory feeling in my reading taste.

My friend’s question has haunted me for over a year, when at last world events set a spark in my writerly imagination. What, indeed, if a novelist set out to write a thriller in a similar vein, in the age of WikiLeaks, the Occupy Movement, and the general discontent with the World Order, that we witness today?

In the age of crowdsourcing – a collaboration of countless minds from across boundaries – the idea of a single person (Ivan Dragomiloff in London’s novel) deciding arbitrarily who ought to be assassinated (“extirpated”), seemed incompatible. A collaborative effort, on the other hand, was much more alluring.

It was, thus, natural that in the time of social networking the people should decide who is detrimental for the wellbeing of society.

WikiJustice was born.