Tag Archives: School

Literature keeps language alive

“literature has one fundamental worth that doesn’t seem to strike most people. Those of us who write, read and study in a particular language help to keep the language alive. No language can stay alive if it’s static, it has to grow by people speaking it, reading it, writing in it. With respect to the literature in a particular language, this is the progression. If today, studying stops, then tomorrow, reading stops. If reading stops, then writing stops, and if writing stops then speaking stops. And if we lose the language, we lose along with it all our sense of culture,heritage and the knowledge of a shared past which binds us together as a community. And this is especially true in case of vernacular literatures. For whatever reason, nearly half the gen-next population today shies away from reading literature in their mother tongue or even speaking in it.”

From: http://m.coolage.in/2014/02/28/proud-to-be-a-lerd-why-studying-literature-is-important/

Reading immunizes against depression

As kids and teenages go back to school, depression linked to change of environment and new challenges might kick in. Putting on headphones and locking yourself in a cocoon won’t help. Reading might:

“Teenagers who devote more time to reading books are far less likely to suffer from depression than their peers who listen to music.”

…”researchers recognise[d] large association between exposure to music and depression”, and “that reading was associated with less likelihood of depression. This is worth emphasising because overall in the US, reading books is decreasing, while nearly all other forms of media use are increasing”.

More: onlinenews.com.pk

On the woes that have befallen our country

On the “woes that have befallen our country on the social, legal, moral and even political arenas, and the role of literature in creating awareness and helping curb these evils and misdeeds”:

“That the eacher is the dispenser of morality in society is undisputed. Literature teachers are expected, through poetry, novels, short stories and oral literature, to inculcate positive morality into young minds. It is these youngsters that later grow into entrepreneurs, politicians, teachers and other members of society.”

Sadly, “We teachers no longer indulge learners in the journey of discovery of the intricacies of literature. Instead we take a short cut by relying on guide books and concentrating on the completion of the syllabus. The best the learners can do is to regurgitate what has been passed down to them. We are doing the nation a disservice.”

“I believe morality cannot be attained through legal restrictions but through the inculcation of moral consciousness in individuals, which leads to social responsibility.”

From: nation.co.ke

Oxygen for the Mind

“Today our children don’t read works of imagination and the results are what we see today. Children or students who don’t ask questions in class but just take in everything the teachers feed them. Because we don’t learn to think, that is why we have students and workers who just copy and paste everything.

“Reading should not end after class or when the teacher leaves the classroom. Both parents and teachers should encourage children to read. Buying them books to read is one thing and making sure they read them is another.

“It’s high time we parents realised the big mistake we are making by taking our children to school but not encouraging them to read.

“…children and young people need good books, funny books, emotional books, fantasy books, books that enable them to think and see in new ways.

“If you live without oxygen, you suffocate. And books are the oxygen of the mind, even in these days of the internet.”

From: ippmedia.com

Books: Don’t mix Work with Pleasure

“Stories are crucial in our lives; we communicate with others using stories all the time. They’re what we tell others about ourselves. They teach us how different people handle different circumstances.”

“When a parent reads to a child, it is an intimate experience involving a strong emotion” … “many educated parents are keen to read to their children. However, they tend to force the habit or use it to teach – or sometimes test – the child’s English vocabulary.”

“This may not be the most ideal and effective strategy to foster a love for reading.”

“Experts have agreed that reading for pleasure and for its own sake is the most beneficial for children… If you want your child to be a successful reader, you should read to them for pleasure. Let the school do the teaching. It should be pure pleasure when you and your child read together. You can laugh over a story or cry over it together.”

“Another golden rule for parents is to allow their children the freedom to choose books that interest them.”

“The worst thing a parent can do is to be critical of a book which means a lot to the child.”

“It’s OK to let children read a book they love again and again. The important thing is they’re free to choose their own books.” For children who are not keen readers, it helps to find out what sparks their imagination and use that as a motivation.”

FROM: scmp.com

Read for Pleasure:

WikiJustice, by Jack King

Dumbing down literature

“From Reader’s Digest to Cliff’s Notes to No Fear Shakespeare, simplified novels have infiltrated American society over generations. They seem innocent enough, flaunting an “easy to read” nature meant to appeal to those less versed in complex literature and language. However, while these watered down novels may be convenient for the busy, story-oriented adult reader, they are hardly appropriate for a class focused on critical reading. They’re a skewed kind of censorship that removes students from the benefits of difficult, close reading and dumbs down the English classroom.

Words are taken out that set the entire mood of the piece; phrases that define the moment and add depth to the author’s style are taken out. Removing these aspects eliminates the experience of analyzing the author’s intent and figuring out why that phrase or scene was deemed necessary.”

From: http://tigernewspaper.com/wordpress/2013/03/14/the-dangers-of-watering-down-literature/

SpyWriter Jack King, the author of:
Agents of Change, WikiJustice, The Black Vault, and The Fifth Internationale.
A new Pope. A new Church. A new world:


http://www.SpyWriter.com

How to get children to read books

“Today, with the widespread of education and the booming of the print industry, we would expect more people getting into reading habits, but this did not happen.

…some people equate reading with studying and do not read in their leisure time.

…instead of passing stories along from one generation to another, children are left to television and internet for entertainment.”

How to change it? A good starting point is your home:

“When children are used to seeing books as part of their home furniture at an early age, it helps them get attached to reading.”

More: http://m.thenational.ae/news/uae-news/education/despite-high-literacy-rate-uae-isnt-reading-books-for-pleasure

SpyWriter Jack King “A new King of thrillers on the horizon” http://www.SpyWriter.com

Why reading is important for children

“Even with video games, computer tablets and other digital resources, the book still remains a powerful tool to tell stories, teach facts, and share experiences.

Reading is very important to character development, to understand how stories flow … I can’t say that our kids are reading less. The amount of time given them to read has changed. They don’t spend as much time in the school library. The teachers want the kids to read, but there is a limit on the time they can devote to that.

Children from lower income homes are not going to have a library inside their home … The school and public library are the only places for them to have the opportunity to experience written stories.

While video lays out a visual story for children, reading compels them to use their imagination to create the characters, setting and situations in the story.”

More: http://m.exponent-telegram.com/article_41947942-5dff-11e2-8fa7-0019bb2963f4.html

SpyWriter Jack King “A new King of thrillers on the horizon” http://www.SpyWriter.com

Books expand the world

“I have been told that many schools have changed their core reading curriculum to include more modern commercial novels…

I believe there are serious consequences to the exchange of commercial writing to classic literature in curriculum. We are graduating students from American high schools, some on their way to four-year universities, with a limited and vapid literary foundation of vampires, werewolves, and wizards. This ignorance means that they will neither be able to complete a New York Times crossword puzzle or receive mercy from an English professor who’s been teaching before Stephenie Meyers was even an idea in her parent’s heads. At its worst, this American generation will go forth in a world with a great dearth of general knowledge, undoubtedly inferior to their contemporaries overseas who have had a more meaningful education, that will detract from many aspects of their lives.

Literature is not just an exercise in creative expression, it reveals and resolves, it engenders compassion and understanding, it expands our world far beyond the borders of the written page.”

From: http://blogcritics.org/books/article/fantasyland-the-limited-world-of-todays/

SpyWriter Jack King “A new King of thrillers on the horizon” http://www.SpyWriter.com

Sick society without literature

Can reading fiction cut selfishness, stop growth of mass-shooting psychopaths? One thing appears certain: reading fiction gives rise to empathy, and empathy leads to a more compassionate society.

“Schools don’t exist as job-training camps. They exist to educate students. To be truly educated, students need to graduate with more imagination, not less. They need to face questions about what it means to be a human being — they need to stop sleepwalking, if they’ve started it already — and they need to start learning how to love strangers. We all know that becoming properly educated is a lifelong endeavor. But Washington gives students a huge disadvantage if it leads them to think that memorizing data and processing facts is 70 percent of living well.”

From: http://www.nationalreview.com/articles/335520/goodbye-liberal-arts-betsy-woodruff?pg=1

“Based on the results of the post-reading exercises, Johnson concluded that the more immersed the readers were in the story, the more empathy they felt for the characters. In addition, he found that the heightened empathy led to an enhanced ability to perceive subtle emotional expressions such as fear or happiness. Individuals who experienced higher levels of empathy were also nearly twice as likely to engage in pro-social, or helpful, behavior as individuals experiencing low levels of empathy.”

From: http://news.blogs.wlu.edu/2012/02/21/washington-and-lee-professor-finds-that-reading-fiction-leads-to-empathy-helpful-behavior/

SpyWriter Jack King: SpyWriter.com | Facebook | Twitter