Tag Archives: Health

Reading = Personal Growth

“According to psychologists, there are two types of mindsets in the world; one, fixed and the other, growth. Those with a fixed mindset believe that their qualities are all pre-determined and they tend to live proving their stagnant beliefs instead of disapproving or building the possibility for a positive change in their talents, behaviours or attitudes. A growth mindset is one that accepts failures as well as challenges without losing hope. It believes that intelligence is not decided at birth but cultivated over time.”

Reading books opens minds.

More on the mamy benefits of reading, including weight loss, creativity, mind flexibility: http://www.onlymyhealth.com/reading-reduces-waistline-no-kidding-1397729297

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Stressed? Read a book.

“A 2009 study from the University of Sussex found that reading silently to oneself, for less than 10 minutes, reduced stress by 68 percent. In fact, reading was more effective at eliminating stress than listening to music (61 percent), having a cup of tea or coffee (54 percent) or taking a walk (42 percent).”

“Psychologists believe this is because the human mind has to concentrate on reading and the distraction of being taken into a literary world eases the tensions in muscles and the heart.”

From: http://www.care2.com/causes/5-ways-reading-a-book-can-improve-your-life.html

Cure for Inhumane Doctors: Literature

“Traditional medical training, focused on bioscience, is […] failing to provide the human, emotional and practical skills doctors need to deal with everyday tragedy, let alone disasters […] “One comes out not knowing how to deal with real-life situations that don’t necessarily require a written prescription.  I believe a number of medical schools around the world might be churning out ‘robots’ with few other human skills.”

“Doctors should learn in a culture that teaches them to recognise and acknowledge human fear, rage, hope, ambivalence, finitude and courage, to be open rather than closed and to flourish in uncertainty rather than the illusion of facts. The arts illuminate this view, not science.”

“80% of diagnoses depend on the patient’s story, and studying poetry or literature can enhance [medical] students’ narrative competence and improve their ability to relate to different cultures and groups.”

From: http://www.theguardian.com/society/2013/nov/19/studying-arts-literature-doctors-humane-competent-mid-staffs

Cure for the restless mind

“A book may offer someone a step-by-step guide to dealing with a mental or emotional issue.”

“There is a degree of scepticism [about it] because its no hard science. Often you rely on people’s experiences and their stories about how it’s helped them but it’s difficult to pin-point exactly what it is about it.”

“I think reading in itself is inherently therapeutic.”

“there is a value in creative reading; novels and poetry provide ways of promoting well-being that let you escape your own worries and learn about your own experiences”.

“I think books have more to offer besides the gaining of intellectual wisdom and artistic value. There’s something magical about how literature can be a platform or spur for people to talk about personal things, which they would otherwise have difficulty expressing. Our brains are wired for narrative. We try and make sense of the out of the chaos of the world through stories and I think that’s why the therapy works.”

More: http://www.impactnottingham.com/2013/12/bibliotherapy-is-literature-the-cure/

Writing Sheds Light on Mental Illness

“I have often analyzed how mental illness can be tracked, discovered, and understood through the written word. Let’s take a break from science and take a look at literature. The analysis of writings opens a door to explore alternative methods of understanding individuals suffering from manic-depressive disorder.

“Through a thorough examination of writings, we can look at specific mental states of individuals, which in turn may inform those looking for answers, or symptoms of bipolar minds, which often times get NOS (Not Otherwise Specified) as a diagnosis.  The medical field continues to evolve in their understanding of the intricate, often mysterious behaviors of manic-depressive individuals.  A look at reoccurring themes and stylistic techniques may reveal affected writers share a commonality in their writings.  An exploration of the works may help find a way for society to better understand individuals suffering from mental disease, and discover those not yet diagnosed with manic-depression.

“Throughout history there have been writers and poets that suffer from manic depression.  If we take a close look at the writings of these renowned writers we find a link to mental illness and the English language. An examination of their stylistic techniques, diction, metaphor, simile and expression manifest their mental illness which can help discover how mental illness can be learned outside of science, engineering, and neurology.”

More: blogs.psychcentral.com

Reading and Healing

“Story-telling has long held a place of prominence in American culture, but only recently has come to be viewed as a having a role in the practice of American medicine … anthropologists, artists, writers, psychologists, physicians and historians … explore the role of stories in medicine and healing.”

“Narrative is gaining recognition in medical schools”.

“Being able to collect better stories from patients helps physicians become better practitioners … Stories are how we get to know each other and how we make sense of our world. When patients read stories about others whose experiences are similar to their own, they know they are not alone.”

From: phys.org

Books never sleep

“Books are the best teachers. They impart knowledge without laughing at our ignorance and stupidity. They never sleep nor do they need food. The onus is on parents and teachers to make youngsters aware of this.”

“When taught to read at a young age, children tend to visualise, imagine and conceptualise better. Their ability to concentrate is heightened, along with their ability to write. All these abilities would definitely be affected if a child is not encouraged by the teacher or parent to take up a book and read.”

“Constant exposure to television, visuals on cellphones and internet could also lead to neurological impairments and dyslexia amongst children…”

More: m.timesofindia.com

Books, nutrition for the soul

“Books are nutrition for the soul.

When creative participation is required, imagination engaged, the experience reaches beyond dubious sustenance to gourmet richness.

Reading is fundamental. Fundamental to learning, yes; but also to thinking. To creativity and imagination, as applied in a very practical sense to life, to work, to growth.

According to the National Literacy Trust, regular book readers have not only better vocabularies, but also more confidence and greater understanding of other people, issues, and cultures. Reading also benefits society; book readers are also more likely to engage in their communities and be better decision makers.”

More: http://m.cdapress.com/columns/sholeh_patrick/article_f75c53b8-2123-504d-9b34-504af35261b3.html

SpyWriter Jack King, the author of:
Agents of Change, WikiJustice, The Black Vault, and The Fifth Internationale.
Coming soon:


http://www.SpyWriter.com

Bibliotherapy

The “Center for Fiction—a nonprofit that holds readings and events, gives writers office space and promotes the general celebration of literature—called A Novel Approach, in which writers and editors involved with the center (“bibliotherapists”) will give you a 45-minute consultation dealing with the life crisis of your choice and prescribe a year’s worth of reading to help you get through it. …

people who consider themselves serious readers believe that reading is “making their lives better, and that they are becoming better human beings through reading”.

From: http://observer.com/2013/02/how-literature-saved-my-psyche-attending-a-book-themed-therapy-session-at-the-center-for-fiction/

SpyWriter Jack King, the author of:
Agents of Change, WikiJustice, The Black Vault, and The Fifth Internationale.
Coming soon:


http://www.SpyWriter.com

Smart Meters. Cancer. Privacy.

Smart meters. They are installed by water companies, and electricity providers.

“Feeling anxious about the high energy microwaves beaming out constantly from these deadly devices? Having nightmares about DNA damage, and fascistic intrusion from ‘your’ power company? … In many states, the power companies send the police along with the installers to force you to submit… In many reports, the home owners are intimidated, roughed up, threatened, abused, and arrested for standing up for their rights against the minions of GUS and ‘big power’. … So what i will do is to put a little ‘cap’ of folded aluminium foil over the broadcast bulb of the smart meter. … it shuts off the microwaves as a source of health degrading energies in my local environment.” Read more: http://www.halfpasthuman.com/smartmeters.html

Smart meters may be not only deadly, they are also intrusive:

“Depending on the functionality of the meter, the smart meter may be able to track how much electricity is used within each room of the home, as well as how much is used by the various new smart appliances in your house. Just as the smart meters can communicate wirelessly with devices such as TV sets or tablets to show you your electrical consumption, they also communicate this information with the power company, which keeps records about the volumes and patterns associated with your daily life. The implications for personal surveillance are staggering.” Read more: http://www.wakingtimes.com/2013/02/14/refusing-smart-meters-to-protect-your-health-and-privacy/

So, you want electricity but not cancer? You can wrap yourself, or the smart meter, in sheet metal. You can stop paying your bill, and maybe they will remove the meter. But, what then?

Some have found a solution: