Tag Archives: Children

From love of reading to a better you

“Love of reading is the key not only to further learning and knowledge, but also to a better and more fulfilled life with unlimited enjoyment and participation in the arts and culture.”

“We cannot begin to understand the world without reading books, newspapers and magazines. Reading teaches empathy in a way that the computer games which many […]  children play never can.”

“Earlier this year the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, a rich countries’ think-tank, revealed that the strongest indicator of the future success of children was not which school they attended or whether their family was wealthy, but if they read for pleasure at the age of 15. Reading teaches children how to express themselves, to broaden their emotional horizons and to cope with difficult situations. It is not just about learning and widening their vocabulary and experiences, but also about understanding the human condition and the lives of others.”

Furthermore, “our skills, intelligence, the way we behave as citizens and the ability to think critically depend on reading”.

Source: timesofmalta.com

Reading for Common Humanity

“In all the academic fluff that is thrown at us when high-brow people start blabbing about the importance of reading, this is never mentioned”:

“a book is a much better babysitter than any toy, television, tablets, Xbox or Playstation.”

Early start at reading leads to a better society:

“Reading helps to keep our prisons in check. Neil Gaiman, writing in The Guardian says how in America they easily predict prison growth on a simple algorithm based on the percen-tage of 10-year-olds couldn’t read. The lower the percentage of child read-ers, the more crowded the prison cells will be in future.”

More importantly still:

“Reading helps us to keep our politicians in check. Because we’ll know what’s happening around the world, and we’d have read the historical precedents, then, we’ll be able to tell our politicians what we want and we’ll be able to rise above party politics and aim for a common humanity.”

Continue reading: http://www.timesofmalta.com/articles/view/20131117/opinion/A-fairy-tale-a-day-does-keep-ignorance-at-bay.495053

Why we love fiction

“How come so many people in the world are drawn towards stories and plots that never even occurred!”

“If we explore this dynamic we will see that each reader is compelled to this genre for different reasons, but of course there are always similarities. It is widely believed that reading fiction is an escapist hobby and this is quite true. The world we live in, the world we adapt to and the life we are bound to may not seem fascinating all the time. We get bored by our daily routines and the repetitive process starts looking like a trap. Now to vent out and feel fabulous many of us choose to pick out a more fantasy version of life. A place where everything is possible, where even for a short time you can live someone else’s life! This doesn’t mean that the person doesn’t have grip on the realities of life. It just shows that all of us are humans and that some magical phenomenon always seems appealing.”

“Apart from that, reading fiction is always a treat for your brain. Encouraging you to think beyond the boundaries of society, creatively and filling you with new ideas. So to all those parents who are always chasing their kids to read more of the academic books than fiction, should remember that your kids are doing mind exercises. So instead of scolding, encourage them to read and introduce them to the world of ‘The Books’.”

Sarwat Amin Rattani, in thefrontierpost.com

Emotional Literacy

“many children lack a sophisticated vocabulary for expressing their emotions, and […] their inability to clearly label their feelings leaves them unable to describe their state of mind in a way that permits teachers to help them.”

“Students should learn to find the language to express the full complexity of human emotion, even emotions that they themselves haven’t yet experienced. The best way to achieve that is to make sure that they […] read and critique poetry, short stories, and novels. Through literature and the arts they will not merely hear and talk about emotions generally, but they will experience and learn to express the interior lives of other people. As a result, they’ll be not only better students, but better people.”

From: today.uconn.edu

Reading and writing prerequisites of future leaders

“As a reflection of many adults, many children nowadays prefer everything to be easy and instant. So parents play a big role in encouraging children to love reading. The role of the school curriculum is also equally important. Regretfully, our educational curriculum today also weighs less on reading and writing”…

“reading and writing were two inseparable skills that children needed to develop, as both skills greatly influenced the development of other soft skills needed in adulthood, such as leadership and the ability to express opinion. “Not only will they be instilled with the value of virtues from the stories they read, reading and writing skills prepare children to be ready to face society, to bravely express their opinions and be less [passive]. I believe, those are some of the qualities required for our future leaders”…

More: thejakartapost.com

Oxygen for the Mind

“Today our children don’t read works of imagination and the results are what we see today. Children or students who don’t ask questions in class but just take in everything the teachers feed them. Because we don’t learn to think, that is why we have students and workers who just copy and paste everything.

“Reading should not end after class or when the teacher leaves the classroom. Both parents and teachers should encourage children to read. Buying them books to read is one thing and making sure they read them is another.

“It’s high time we parents realised the big mistake we are making by taking our children to school but not encouraging them to read.

“…children and young people need good books, funny books, emotional books, fantasy books, books that enable them to think and see in new ways.

“If you live without oxygen, you suffocate. And books are the oxygen of the mind, even in these days of the internet.”

From: ippmedia.com

Reading: The best Habit

“One of the best habits a parent or individual can inculcate in a child is the habit of reading. To encourage a child the pursuit of reading in the early stages is to ensure a continous process of discovery and learning, bridging the gap that the shortcomings of a formal system of education may have, which makes reading even more imperative. Reading books has many benefits both mentally and morally. What was once a preserve of the affluent and elite in society is now a tool of empowerment to the common man.

“The experience of reading can be for everyone. It brings out the rationalist in you and at the save time teaches you to dream. It takes you on journeys to far-off places and brings you back with a better realisation of the worth of your place and your own. It lets you like the lives of unknown men and women, feeling their joys and tears, getting carried away in their causes. Some inspire, some are lessons in introspection. For those who came in late, it’s never too late to begin. To not experience the joys of reading, therein lies the travesty.”

From: morungexpress.com

Books: Don’t mix Work with Pleasure

“Stories are crucial in our lives; we communicate with others using stories all the time. They’re what we tell others about ourselves. They teach us how different people handle different circumstances.”

“When a parent reads to a child, it is an intimate experience involving a strong emotion” … “many educated parents are keen to read to their children. However, they tend to force the habit or use it to teach – or sometimes test – the child’s English vocabulary.”

“This may not be the most ideal and effective strategy to foster a love for reading.”

“Experts have agreed that reading for pleasure and for its own sake is the most beneficial for children… If you want your child to be a successful reader, you should read to them for pleasure. Let the school do the teaching. It should be pure pleasure when you and your child read together. You can laugh over a story or cry over it together.”

“Another golden rule for parents is to allow their children the freedom to choose books that interest them.”

“The worst thing a parent can do is to be critical of a book which means a lot to the child.”

“It’s OK to let children read a book they love again and again. The important thing is they’re free to choose their own books.” For children who are not keen readers, it helps to find out what sparks their imagination and use that as a motivation.”

FROM: scmp.com

Read for Pleasure:

WikiJustice, by Jack King

Books make dreams come true

“I know there are children in your community with their own dreams. They dream of becoming a doctor or an inventor or a minister. Who knows, maybe there is a little girl whose dream is to be a writer and singer.

“The seeds of these dreams are often found in books and the seeds you help plant in your community can grow across the world. I hope you’ll agree to become a champion of the Imagination Library in your community.

“You will be amazed at the impact this simple gift can have on the lives of children and their families. We have seen it work in our backyard and I’m certain it can do the same in your community too!”

Dolly Parton

Books never sleep

“Books are the best teachers. They impart knowledge without laughing at our ignorance and stupidity. They never sleep nor do they need food. The onus is on parents and teachers to make youngsters aware of this.”

“When taught to read at a young age, children tend to visualise, imagine and conceptualise better. Their ability to concentrate is heightened, along with their ability to write. All these abilities would definitely be affected if a child is not encouraged by the teacher or parent to take up a book and read.”

“Constant exposure to television, visuals on cellphones and internet could also lead to neurological impairments and dyslexia amongst children…”

More: m.timesofindia.com